Socialist Filmmaker's Hypocrisy Exposed

Socialist Filmmaker's Hypocrisy Exposed
Wikimedia Commons

Michael Moore is in the news again this time for his hypocrisy. The filmmaker who is a champion of the people refuses to pay his vendors for their service.

According to The Daily Beast:

Last week at the Toronto International Film Festival, Michael Moore debuted his latest film, Fahrenheit 11/9. The Daily Beast described the political doc as a fast-paced, wide-reaching project, jumping from Flint, Michigan to Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (and stopping along the way to compare Donald Trump to Adolf Hitler). As Natalia Winkelman wrote, “Moore’s best zingers and most penetrating indictments land on the Democratic Party, whom he implicates (along with dominant liberal news media) as part of an establishment system continually churning in place to maintain the status quo and impede forward movement. He even calls out Obama on a few occasions: for letting down the people of Flint, for accepting Goldman Sachs money, for deporting immigrants, for drone strikes. But best of all, Moore acknowledges and emphasizes that he himself is not totally free from that establishment either.”

Apparently, Michael Moore is struggling to reconcile his revolutionary brand with his status as a famous, wealthy filmmaker. Simultaneously, critics of the documentarian are calling hypocrisy, insisting that Moore’s conduct is at odds with his reputation as a champion of the people.

In early June, Boston Light & Sound, Inc. filed a lawsuit against Moore’s Traverse City Film Festival. In the claim, BL&S stated that a total payment of $256,500 had been due by September 30, 2017, for their work on the 2017 film festival. “TCFF paid a $100,0000 deposit towards the Contract Amount on July 12, 2017,” legal docs claimed. “BL&S performed all of its obligations pursuant to the contract. However, since the 2017 film festival, TCFF has only paid an additional $2,000 toward the outstanding balance owed.” That brings the alleged balance down to $159,055.

Chapin Cutler, the President of Boston Light & Sound, a 13-year Film Fest collaborator, “said his 2017 contract with Film Fest, totaling $256,500, was comparable to past contracts and pricing has not changed,” the Traverse City Record-Eagle reported. In April 2018, Michael Moore revealed that the Traverse City Film Fest “ran a rare deficit last year.”

It looks like Moore might be hurting for money and that may be the reason why he has made so many outlandish statements ahead of his new movie.

 Source: American Update

People, Places & Things

Article Index